Louis C.K. interviewed by The Hollywood Reporter about New York

Louis C.K. interviewed by The Hollywood Reporter about New York

If somebody said to me, "Here's a part in a play," I'd definitely try it, and some day I'd like to try to write one. That's a huge mystery to me. Every time I go to a Broadway play of any kind — good or bad — as soon as the lights go out and people come onstage and start to speak, I start to cry. I can't help it. The first minute of any play feels really stupid — they're pretending the audience isn't there, and they're having this loud dialogue, and you're like, "What the f— are these people doing?" — but it's so vulnerable. It's such an effort, and it's such a generous thing to do, and so I always get all choked up.

As is always the case with Louis C.K., there are a bunch of great stories about comedy, New York and what else he's working on at the moment in the article.

This bit about the similarities and differences between L.A. and New York stood out:

The difference between there and here is that the whole city of L.A. is given to this industry. It's a community of artists, but there's also an old-fashioned, almost plantation-y feeling to California. There's a whole, huge [class] of people — the El Salvadorans, the Guatemalans — who make the city run, and they're invisible to people. So when you go to L.A. and your liberal friend is rude to the valet guy or the busboy, it can be a little shocking. In New York, everyone is so mixed together that there's less of a feeling of class here. Outside some fancy office building, you see a CEO getting his cigarette lit by a cleaning lady. Everybody is dealing with the same shit, everybody is on the subway elbow-to-elbow.